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Fact Sheet: The Army Breakout from the Pusan Perimeter

 

 

On Sept. 16, one day after the Inchon landing, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker's Eighth Army (EUSA) began to push out of the Pusan Perimeter. In mounting this offensive, General Walker had under his command the 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions, and I Corps. Attached to the corps were the U.S. 24th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions, the 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), the British 27th Infantry Brigade, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK) 1st Infantry Division and supporting troops. Later, on Sept. 23, IX Corps became operational and had the 2d and 25th Divisions attached to it. Walker's 140,000-man force stood opposite approximately 70,000 North Korean soldiers on the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September 1950. 
 
On the eve of EUSA's offensive, the North Koreans began another attack east from Waegwan with its main effort directed along the Taegu-Kumchon-Taejon-Suwon axis. The momentum of the breakout built up slowly in the face of enemy resistance centered on several hills that controlled Eighth Army's main avenues of advance out of the Pusan Perimeter. 
 
A critical terrain feature in the breakout was Hill 268 which controlled the Taegu road and the main highway running from Waegwan south along the east bank of the Naktong River. On Sept. 16, and for the next three days, 5th RCT sol-diers met stiff enemy resistance in their battle for the hill. Halfway up the finger of Hill 268 the Americans became pinned down by enemy rifle fire and grenades coming from the trenches on the south side. After subduing the entrenched enemy, the 5th RCT penetrated the North Korean's defensive position. As North Korean soldiers fled to the north end of Hill 268, the Americans continued their assault. 
 
With the Waegwan-Taegu road opened, the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 7th Cavalry pushed northeast up the road. The regiment's 1st Battalion turned east toward Tabu-dong and captured the town the next day and then turned south toward Taegu. On Sept. 21, the 1st Battalion linked up with the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, which was attacking north from Taegu. The link-up by the Americans at Tabu-dong encircled and cut off large elements of the North Korean 1st, 3rd, and 13th Divisions. With the U.S. Army 24th Infantry Division in reserve, 1st Cavalry Division forces advanced from Tabu-dong northward by the way of Poun and Chongju. In one day, Sept. 26, elements of the division traveled more than 100 miles from north of the Naktong to the north of Osan, where it linked up with elements of the 31st Infantry of the 7th Infantry Division.
 
In southwestern Korea, the 25th Infantry Division experienced heavy going for the first few days in its drive down the Masan-Chinju road; but it soon gained momentum, and on Sept. 26, the division was several miles west of Chinju. By the end of September, the division had seized the west coast port of Kunsan. Along the east coast the advancing South Korean Army also forced the enemy into a general retreat.
 
As anticipated by MacArthur, the North Korean army was cut off and in retreat; United Nations Command forces captured 23,000 enemy personnel. The North Korean Army then fighting in South Korea disintegrated as an effective military force. While some North Koreans escaped to the north, others became guerrillas in the south. With the liberation of Seoul by X Corps, the return of the city to the South Korean government on Sept. 29, and the end of organized enemy resistance in the south, U.N. and American officials faced a new situation that presented an opportunity to achieve wider military and political objectives.
 
The breakout from the Pusan Perimeter cost the U.S. Army 4,334 casualties: 790 killed and 3,544 wounded.
 

Sources

 
Appleman, Roy E. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu (1986).
 
Department of Military Art and Engineering. Operations in Korea (1956).
 
Esposito, Vincent J., ed. The West Point Atlas of American Wars, 1900—1953 2, (1959).
 
Sandler, Stanley, ed. The Korean War, An Encyclopedia (1995).
 
Summers, Harry G., Jr. Korean War Almanac (1990).
 
For additional information contact:
The U.S. Army Center of Military History
103 Third Avenue
Fort Lesley J. McNair
Washington, D.C. 20319-5058

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  • History
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[theme_arguments] => a:0:{} [type] => 6 [description] => [in_active_trail] => [access] => 1 [href] => node/451 [localized_options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) ) ) [993] => Array ( [#theme] => menu_link__main_menu [#attributes] => Array ( [class] => Array ( [0] => last [1] => leaf ) ) [#title] => Forums [#href] => forum/6 [#localized_options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) [#below] => Array ( ) [#original_link] => Array ( [menu_name] => main-menu [mlid] => 993 [plid] => 418 [link_path] => forum/6 [router_path] => forum/% [link_title] => Forums [options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) [module] => menu [hidden] => 0 [external] => 0 [has_children] => 0 [expanded] => 0 [weight] => -42 [depth] => 2 [customized] => 1 [p1] => 418 [p2] => 993 [p3] => 0 [p4] => 0 [p5] => 0 [p6] => 0 [p7] => 0 [p8] => 0 [p9] => 0 [updated] => 0 [load_functions] => Array ( [1] => forum_forum_load ) [to_arg_functions] => [access_callback] => user_access [access_arguments] => 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[to_arg_functions] => [access_callback] => node_access [access_arguments] => a:2:{i:0;s:4:"view";i:1;i:1;} [page_callback] => node_page_view [page_arguments] => a:1:{i:0;i:1;} [delivery_callback] => [tab_parent] => [tab_root] => node/% [title] => Outreach [title_callback] => node_page_title [title_arguments] => a:1:{i:0;i:1;} [theme_callback] => [theme_arguments] => a:0:{} [type] => 6 [description] => [in_active_trail] => [access] => 1 [href] => node/435 [localized_options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) ) [#children] =>
  • Outreach
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) ) [module] => menu [hidden] => 0 [external] => 0 [has_children] => 0 [expanded] => 0 [weight] => -49 [depth] => 2 [customized] => 1 [p1] => 758 [p2] => 427 [p3] => 0 [p4] => 0 [p5] => 0 [p6] => 0 [p7] => 0 [p8] => 0 [p9] => 0 [updated] => 0 [load_functions] => a:1:{i:1;s:9:"node_load";} [to_arg_functions] => [access_callback] => node_access [access_arguments] => a:2:{i:0;s:4:"view";i:1;i:1;} [page_callback] => node_page_view [page_arguments] => a:1:{i:0;i:1;} [delivery_callback] => [tab_parent] => [tab_root] => node/% [title] => KW60 Newsletter [title_callback] => node_page_title [title_arguments] => a:1:{i:0;i:1;} [theme_callback] => [theme_arguments] => a:0:{} [type] => 6 [description] => [in_active_trail] => [access] => 1 [href] => node/271 [localized_options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) ) ) [982] => Array ( [#theme] => menu_link__main_menu [#attributes] => Array ( [class] => Array ( [0] => leaf ) ) [#title] => Latest News [#href] => blog [#localized_options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) [#below] => Array ( ) [#original_link] => Array ( [menu_name] => main-menu [mlid] => 982 [plid] => 758 [link_path] => blog [router_path] => blog [link_title] => Latest News [options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) [module] => system [hidden] => 0 [external] => 0 [has_children] => 0 [expanded] => 0 [weight] => -48 [depth] => 2 [customized] => 1 [p1] => 758 [p2] => 982 [p3] => 0 [p4] => 0 [p5] => 0 [p6] => 0 [p7] => 0 [p8] => 0 [p9] => 0 [updated] => 0 [load_functions] => [to_arg_functions] => [access_callback] => views_access [access_arguments] => a:1:{i:0;a:2:{i:0;s:16:"views_check_perm";i:1;a:1:{i:0;s:14:"access content";}}} [page_callback] => views_page [page_arguments] => a:2:{i:0;s:15:"enterprise_blog";i:1;s:4:"page";} [delivery_callback] => [tab_parent] => [tab_root] => blog [title] => Latest News [title_callback] => t [title_arguments] => [theme_callback] => [theme_arguments] => a:0:{} [type] => 6 [description] => [in_active_trail] => [href] => 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[delivery_callback] => [tab_parent] => [tab_root] => node/% [title] => Press Coverage [title_callback] => node_page_title [title_arguments] => a:1:{i:0;i:1;} [theme_callback] => [theme_arguments] => a:0:{} [type] => 6 [description] => [in_active_trail] => [access] => 1 [href] => node/460 [localized_options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) ) ) [422] => Array ( [#theme] => menu_link__main_menu [#attributes] => Array ( [class] => Array ( [0] => last [1] => leaf ) ) [#title] => Public Service Announcements [#href] => node/266 [#localized_options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) [#below] => Array ( ) [#original_link] => Array ( [menu_name] => main-menu [mlid] => 422 [plid] => 758 [link_path] => node/266 [router_path] => node/% [link_title] => Public Service Announcements [options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) [module] => menu [hidden] => 0 [external] => 0 [has_children] => 0 [expanded] => 0 [weight] => -45 [depth] => 2 [customized] => 1 [p1] => 758 [p2] => 422 [p3] => 0 [p4] => 0 [p5] => 0 [p6] => 0 [p7] => 0 [p8] => 0 [p9] => 0 [updated] => 0 [load_functions] => a:1:{i:1;s:9:"node_load";} [to_arg_functions] => [access_callback] => node_access [access_arguments] => a:2:{i:0;s:4:"view";i:1;i:1;} [page_callback] => node_page_view [page_arguments] => a:1:{i:0;i:1;} [delivery_callback] => [tab_parent] => [tab_root] => node/% [title] => Public Service Announcements [title_callback] => node_page_title [title_arguments] => a:1:{i:0;i:1;} [theme_callback] => [theme_arguments] => a:0:{} [type] => 6 [description] => [in_active_trail] => [access] => 1 [href] => node/266 [localized_options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) ) ) [#sorted] => 1 [#theme_wrappers] => Array ( [0] => menu_tree__main_menu ) ) [#original_link] => Array ( [menu_name] => main-menu [mlid] => 758 [plid] => 0 [link_path] => node/267 [router_path] => node/% [link_title] => Media & Press [options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) [module] => menu [hidden] => 0 [external] => 0 [has_children] => 1 [expanded] => 1 [weight] => -46 [depth] => 1 [customized] => 1 [p1] => 758 [p2] => 0 [p3] => 0 [p4] => 0 [p5] => 0 [p6] => 0 [p7] => 0 [p8] => 0 [p9] => 0 [updated] => 0 [load_functions] => a:1:{i:1;s:9:"node_load";} [to_arg_functions] => [access_callback] => node_access [access_arguments] => a:2:{i:0;s:4:"view";i:1;i:1;} [page_callback] => node_page_view [page_arguments] => a:1:{i:0;i:1;} [delivery_callback] => [tab_parent] => [tab_root] => node/% [title] => Media & Press [title_callback] => node_page_title [title_arguments] => a:1:{i:0;i:1;} [theme_callback] => [theme_arguments] => a:0:{} [type] => 6 [description] => [in_active_trail] => [access] => 1 [href] => node/267 [localized_options] => Array ( [attributes] => Array ( ) ) ) [#children] =>
  • Media & Press
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  • Donate
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    On Sept. 16, one day after the Inchon landing, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker's Eighth Army (EUSA) began to push out of the Pusan Perimeter. In mounting this offensive, General Walker had under his command the 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions, and I Corps. Attached to the corps were the U.S. 24th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions, the 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), the British 27th Infantry Brigade, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK) 1st Infantry Division and supporting troops. Later, on Sept. 23, IX Corps became operational and had the 2d and 25th Divisions attached to it. Walker's 140,000-man force stood opposite approximately 70,000 North Korean soldiers on the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September 1950. 
     
    On the eve of EUSA's offensive, the North Koreans began another attack east from Waegwan with its main effort directed along the Taegu-Kumchon-Taejon-Suwon axis. The momentum of the breakout built up slowly in the face of enemy resistance centered on several hills that controlled Eighth Army's main avenues of advance out of the Pusan Perimeter. 
     
    A critical terrain feature in the breakout was Hill 268 which controlled the Taegu road and the main highway running from Waegwan south along the east bank of the Naktong River. On Sept. 16, and for the next three days, 5th RCT sol-diers met stiff enemy resistance in their battle for the hill. Halfway up the finger of Hill 268 the Americans became pinned down by enemy rifle fire and grenades coming from the trenches on the south side. After subduing the entrenched enemy, the 5th RCT penetrated the North Korean's defensive position. As North Korean soldiers fled to the north end of Hill 268, the Americans continued their assault. 
     
    With the Waegwan-Taegu road opened, the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 7th Cavalry pushed northeast up the road. The regiment's 1st Battalion turned east toward Tabu-dong and captured the town the next day and then turned south toward Taegu. On Sept. 21, the 1st Battalion linked up with the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, which was attacking north from Taegu. The link-up by the Americans at Tabu-dong encircled and cut off large elements of the North Korean 1st, 3rd, and 13th Divisions. With the U.S. Army 24th Infantry Division in reserve, 1st Cavalry Division forces advanced from Tabu-dong northward by the way of Poun and Chongju. In one day, Sept. 26, elements of the division traveled more than 100 miles from north of the Naktong to the north of Osan, where it linked up with elements of the 31st Infantry of the 7th Infantry Division.
     
    In southwestern Korea, the 25th Infantry Division experienced heavy going for the first few days in its drive down the Masan-Chinju road; but it soon gained momentum, and on Sept. 26, the division was several miles west of Chinju. By the end of September, the division had seized the west coast port of Kunsan. Along the east coast the advancing South Korean Army also forced the enemy into a general retreat.
     
    As anticipated by MacArthur, the North Korean army was cut off and in retreat; United Nations Command forces captured 23,000 enemy personnel. The North Korean Army then fighting in South Korea disintegrated as an effective military force. While some North Koreans escaped to the north, others became guerrillas in the south. With the liberation of Seoul by X Corps, the return of the city to the South Korean government on Sept. 29, and the end of organized enemy resistance in the south, U.N. and American officials faced a new situation that presented an opportunity to achieve wider military and political objectives.
     
    The breakout from the Pusan Perimeter cost the U.S. Army 4,334 casualties: 790 killed and 3,544 wounded.
     

    Sources

     
    Appleman, Roy E. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu (1986).
     
    Department of Military Art and Engineering. Operations in Korea (1956).
     
    Esposito, Vincent J., ed. The West Point Atlas of American Wars, 1900—1953 2, (1959).
     
    Sandler, Stanley, ed. The Korean War, An Encyclopedia (1995).
     
    Summers, Harry G., Jr. Korean War Almanac (1990).
     
    For additional information contact:
    The U.S. Army Center of Military History
    103 Third Avenue
    Fort Lesley J. McNair
    Washington, D.C. 20319-5058
    [summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

     

     

    On Sept. 16, one day after the Inchon landing, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker's Eighth Army (EUSA) began to push out of the Pusan Perimeter. In mounting this offensive, General Walker had under his command the 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions, and I Corps. Attached to the corps were the U.S. 24th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions, the 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), the British 27th Infantry Brigade, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK) 1st Infantry Division and supporting troops. Later, on Sept. 23, IX Corps became operational and had the 2d and 25th Divisions attached to it. Walker's 140,000-man force stood opposite approximately 70,000 North Korean soldiers on the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September 1950. 
     
    On the eve of EUSA's offensive, the North Koreans began another attack east from Waegwan with its main effort directed along the Taegu-Kumchon-Taejon-Suwon axis. The momentum of the breakout built up slowly in the face of enemy resistance centered on several hills that controlled Eighth Army's main avenues of advance out of the Pusan Perimeter. 
     
    A critical terrain feature in the breakout was Hill 268 which controlled the Taegu road and the main highway running from Waegwan south along the east bank of the Naktong River. On Sept. 16, and for the next three days, 5th RCT sol-diers met stiff enemy resistance in their battle for the hill. Halfway up the finger of Hill 268 the Americans became pinned down by enemy rifle fire and grenades coming from the trenches on the south side. After subduing the entrenched enemy, the 5th RCT penetrated the North Korean's defensive position. As North Korean soldiers fled to the north end of Hill 268, the Americans continued their assault. 
     
    With the Waegwan-Taegu road opened, the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 7th Cavalry pushed northeast up the road. The regiment's 1st Battalion turned east toward Tabu-dong and captured the town the next day and then turned south toward Taegu. On Sept. 21, the 1st Battalion linked up with the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, which was attacking north from Taegu. The link-up by the Americans at Tabu-dong encircled and cut off large elements of the North Korean 1st, 3rd, and 13th Divisions. With the U.S. Army 24th Infantry Division in reserve, 1st Cavalry Division forces advanced from Tabu-dong northward by the way of Poun and Chongju. In one day, Sept. 26, elements of the division traveled more than 100 miles from north of the Naktong to the north of Osan, where it linked up with elements of the 31st Infantry of the 7th Infantry Division.
     
    In southwestern Korea, the 25th Infantry Division experienced heavy going for the first few days in its drive down the Masan-Chinju road; but it soon gained momentum, and on Sept. 26, the division was several miles west of Chinju. By the end of September, the division had seized the west coast port of Kunsan. Along the east coast the advancing South Korean Army also forced the enemy into a general retreat.
     
    As anticipated by MacArthur, the North Korean army was cut off and in retreat; United Nations Command forces captured 23,000 enemy personnel. The North Korean Army then fighting in South Korea disintegrated as an effective military force. While some North Koreans escaped to the north, others became guerrillas in the south. With the liberation of Seoul by X Corps, the return of the city to the South Korean government on Sept. 29, and the end of organized enemy resistance in the south, U.N. and American officials faced a new situation that presented an opportunity to achieve wider military and political objectives.
     
    The breakout from the Pusan Perimeter cost the U.S. Army 4,334 casualties: 790 killed and 3,544 wounded.
     

    Sources

     
    Appleman, Roy E. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu (1986).
     
    Department of Military Art and Engineering. Operations in Korea (1956).
     
    Esposito, Vincent J., ed. The West Point Atlas of American Wars, 1900—1953 2, (1959).
     
    Sandler, Stanley, ed. The Korean War, An Encyclopedia (1995).
     
    Summers, Harry G., Jr. Korean War Almanac (1990).
     
    For additional information contact:
    The U.S. Army Center of Military History
    103 Third Avenue
    Fort Lesley J. McNair
    Washington, D.C. 20319-5058
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    On Sept. 16, one day after the Inchon landing, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker's Eighth Army (EUSA) began to push out of the Pusan Perimeter. In mounting this offensive, General Walker had under his command the 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions, and I Corps. Attached to the corps were the U.S. 24th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions, the 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), the British 27th Infantry Brigade, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK) 1st Infantry Division and supporting troops. Later, on Sept. 23, IX Corps became operational and had the 2d and 25th Divisions attached to it. Walker's 140,000-man force stood opposite approximately 70,000 North Korean soldiers on the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September 1950. 
     
    On the eve of EUSA's offensive, the North Koreans began another attack east from Waegwan with its main effort directed along the Taegu-Kumchon-Taejon-Suwon axis. The momentum of the breakout built up slowly in the face of enemy resistance centered on several hills that controlled Eighth Army's main avenues of advance out of the Pusan Perimeter. 
     
    A critical terrain feature in the breakout was Hill 268 which controlled the Taegu road and the main highway running from Waegwan south along the east bank of the Naktong River. On Sept. 16, and for the next three days, 5th RCT sol-diers met stiff enemy resistance in their battle for the hill. Halfway up the finger of Hill 268 the Americans became pinned down by enemy rifle fire and grenades coming from the trenches on the south side. After subduing the entrenched enemy, the 5th RCT penetrated the North Korean's defensive position. As North Korean soldiers fled to the north end of Hill 268, the Americans continued their assault. 
     
    With the Waegwan-Taegu road opened, the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 7th Cavalry pushed northeast up the road. The regiment's 1st Battalion turned east toward Tabu-dong and captured the town the next day and then turned south toward Taegu. On Sept. 21, the 1st Battalion linked up with the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, which was attacking north from Taegu. The link-up by the Americans at Tabu-dong encircled and cut off large elements of the North Korean 1st, 3rd, and 13th Divisions. With the U.S. Army 24th Infantry Division in reserve, 1st Cavalry Division forces advanced from Tabu-dong northward by the way of Poun and Chongju. In one day, Sept. 26, elements of the division traveled more than 100 miles from north of the Naktong to the north of Osan, where it linked up with elements of the 31st Infantry of the 7th Infantry Division.
     
    In southwestern Korea, the 25th Infantry Division experienced heavy going for the first few days in its drive down the Masan-Chinju road; but it soon gained momentum, and on Sept. 26, the division was several miles west of Chinju. By the end of September, the division had seized the west coast port of Kunsan. Along the east coast the advancing South Korean Army also forced the enemy into a general retreat.
     
    As anticipated by MacArthur, the North Korean army was cut off and in retreat; United Nations Command forces captured 23,000 enemy personnel. The North Korean Army then fighting in South Korea disintegrated as an effective military force. While some North Koreans escaped to the north, others became guerrillas in the south. With the liberation of Seoul by X Corps, the return of the city to the South Korean government on Sept. 29, and the end of organized enemy resistance in the south, U.N. and American officials faced a new situation that presented an opportunity to achieve wider military and political objectives.
     
    The breakout from the Pusan Perimeter cost the U.S. Army 4,334 casualties: 790 killed and 3,544 wounded.
     

    Sources

     
    Appleman, Roy E. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu (1986).
     
    Department of Military Art and Engineering. Operations in Korea (1956).
     
    Esposito, Vincent J., ed. The West Point Atlas of American Wars, 1900—1953 2, (1959).
     
    Sandler, Stanley, ed. The Korean War, An Encyclopedia (1995).
     
    Summers, Harry G., Jr. Korean War Almanac (1990).
     
    For additional information contact:
    The U.S. Army Center of Military History
    103 Third Avenue
    Fort Lesley J. McNair
    Washington, D.C. 20319-5058
    [summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

     

     

    On Sept. 16, one day after the Inchon landing, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker's Eighth Army (EUSA) began to push out of the Pusan Perimeter. In mounting this offensive, General Walker had under his command the 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions, and I Corps. Attached to the corps were the U.S. 24th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions, the 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), the British 27th Infantry Brigade, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK) 1st Infantry Division and supporting troops. Later, on Sept. 23, IX Corps became operational and had the 2d and 25th Divisions attached to it. Walker's 140,000-man force stood opposite approximately 70,000 North Korean soldiers on the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September 1950. 
     
    On the eve of EUSA's offensive, the North Koreans began another attack east from Waegwan with its main effort directed along the Taegu-Kumchon-Taejon-Suwon axis. The momentum of the breakout built up slowly in the face of enemy resistance centered on several hills that controlled Eighth Army's main avenues of advance out of the Pusan Perimeter. 
     
    A critical terrain feature in the breakout was Hill 268 which controlled the Taegu road and the main highway running from Waegwan south along the east bank of the Naktong River. On Sept. 16, and for the next three days, 5th RCT sol-diers met stiff enemy resistance in their battle for the hill. Halfway up the finger of Hill 268 the Americans became pinned down by enemy rifle fire and grenades coming from the trenches on the south side. After subduing the entrenched enemy, the 5th RCT penetrated the North Korean's defensive position. As North Korean soldiers fled to the north end of Hill 268, the Americans continued their assault. 
     
    With the Waegwan-Taegu road opened, the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 7th Cavalry pushed northeast up the road. The regiment's 1st Battalion turned east toward Tabu-dong and captured the town the next day and then turned south toward Taegu. On Sept. 21, the 1st Battalion linked up with the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, which was attacking north from Taegu. The link-up by the Americans at Tabu-dong encircled and cut off large elements of the North Korean 1st, 3rd, and 13th Divisions. With the U.S. Army 24th Infantry Division in reserve, 1st Cavalry Division forces advanced from Tabu-dong northward by the way of Poun and Chongju. In one day, Sept. 26, elements of the division traveled more than 100 miles from north of the Naktong to the north of Osan, where it linked up with elements of the 31st Infantry of the 7th Infantry Division.
     
    In southwestern Korea, the 25th Infantry Division experienced heavy going for the first few days in its drive down the Masan-Chinju road; but it soon gained momentum, and on Sept. 26, the division was several miles west of Chinju. By the end of September, the division had seized the west coast port of Kunsan. Along the east coast the advancing South Korean Army also forced the enemy into a general retreat.
     
    As anticipated by MacArthur, the North Korean army was cut off and in retreat; United Nations Command forces captured 23,000 enemy personnel. The North Korean Army then fighting in South Korea disintegrated as an effective military force. While some North Koreans escaped to the north, others became guerrillas in the south. With the liberation of Seoul by X Corps, the return of the city to the South Korean government on Sept. 29, and the end of organized enemy resistance in the south, U.N. and American officials faced a new situation that presented an opportunity to achieve wider military and political objectives.
     
    The breakout from the Pusan Perimeter cost the U.S. Army 4,334 casualties: 790 killed and 3,544 wounded.
     

    Sources

     
    Appleman, Roy E. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu (1986).
     
    Department of Military Art and Engineering. Operations in Korea (1956).
     
    Esposito, Vincent J., ed. The West Point Atlas of American Wars, 1900—1953 2, (1959).
     
    Sandler, Stanley, ed. The Korean War, An Encyclopedia (1995).
     
    Summers, Harry G., Jr. Korean War Almanac (1990).
     
    For additional information contact:
    The U.S. Army Center of Military History
    103 Third Avenue
    Fort Lesley J. McNair
    Washington, D.C. 20319-5058
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    On Sept. 16, one day after the Inchon landing, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker's Eighth Army (EUSA) began to push out of the Pusan Perimeter. In mounting this offensive, General Walker had under his command the 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions, and I Corps. Attached to the corps were the U.S. 24th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions, the 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), the British 27th Infantry Brigade, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK) 1st Infantry Division and supporting troops. Later, on Sept. 23, IX Corps became operational and had the 2d and 25th Divisions attached to it. Walker's 140,000-man force stood opposite approximately 70,000 North Korean soldiers on the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September 1950. 
     
    On the eve of EUSA's offensive, the North Koreans began another attack east from Waegwan with its main effort directed along the Taegu-Kumchon-Taejon-Suwon axis. The momentum of the breakout built up slowly in the face of enemy resistance centered on several hills that controlled Eighth Army's main avenues of advance out of the Pusan Perimeter. 
     
    A critical terrain feature in the breakout was Hill 268 which controlled the Taegu road and the main highway running from Waegwan south along the east bank of the Naktong River. On Sept. 16, and for the next three days, 5th RCT sol-diers met stiff enemy resistance in their battle for the hill. Halfway up the finger of Hill 268 the Americans became pinned down by enemy rifle fire and grenades coming from the trenches on the south side. After subduing the entrenched enemy, the 5th RCT penetrated the North Korean's defensive position. As North Korean soldiers fled to the north end of Hill 268, the Americans continued their assault. 
     
    With the Waegwan-Taegu road opened, the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 7th Cavalry pushed northeast up the road. The regiment's 1st Battalion turned east toward Tabu-dong and captured the town the next day and then turned south toward Taegu. On Sept. 21, the 1st Battalion linked up with the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, which was attacking north from Taegu. The link-up by the Americans at Tabu-dong encircled and cut off large elements of the North Korean 1st, 3rd, and 13th Divisions. With the U.S. Army 24th Infantry Division in reserve, 1st Cavalry Division forces advanced from Tabu-dong northward by the way of Poun and Chongju. In one day, Sept. 26, elements of the division traveled more than 100 miles from north of the Naktong to the north of Osan, where it linked up with elements of the 31st Infantry of the 7th Infantry Division.
     
    In southwestern Korea, the 25th Infantry Division experienced heavy going for the first few days in its drive down the Masan-Chinju road; but it soon gained momentum, and on Sept. 26, the division was several miles west of Chinju. By the end of September, the division had seized the west coast port of Kunsan. Along the east coast the advancing South Korean Army also forced the enemy into a general retreat.
     
    As anticipated by MacArthur, the North Korean army was cut off and in retreat; United Nations Command forces captured 23,000 enemy personnel. The North Korean Army then fighting in South Korea disintegrated as an effective military force. While some North Koreans escaped to the north, others became guerrillas in the south. With the liberation of Seoul by X Corps, the return of the city to the South Korean government on Sept. 29, and the end of organized enemy resistance in the south, U.N. and American officials faced a new situation that presented an opportunity to achieve wider military and political objectives.
     
    The breakout from the Pusan Perimeter cost the U.S. Army 4,334 casualties: 790 killed and 3,544 wounded.
     

    Sources

     
    Appleman, Roy E. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu (1986).
     
    Department of Military Art and Engineering. Operations in Korea (1956).
     
    Esposito, Vincent J., ed. The West Point Atlas of American Wars, 1900—1953 2, (1959).
     
    Sandler, Stanley, ed. The Korean War, An Encyclopedia (1995).
     
    Summers, Harry G., Jr. Korean War Almanac (1990).
     
    For additional information contact:
    The U.S. Army Center of Military History
    103 Third Avenue
    Fort Lesley J. McNair
    Washington, D.C. 20319-5058
    [summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>

     

     

    On Sept. 16, one day after the Inchon landing, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker's Eighth Army (EUSA) began to push out of the Pusan Perimeter. In mounting this offensive, General Walker had under his command the 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions, and I Corps. Attached to the corps were the U.S. 24th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions, the 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), the British 27th Infantry Brigade, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK) 1st Infantry Division and supporting troops. Later, on Sept. 23, IX Corps became operational and had the 2d and 25th Divisions attached to it. Walker's 140,000-man force stood opposite approximately 70,000 North Korean soldiers on the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September 1950. 
     
    On the eve of EUSA's offensive, the North Koreans began another attack east from Waegwan with its main effort directed along the Taegu-Kumchon-Taejon-Suwon axis. The momentum of the breakout built up slowly in the face of enemy resistance centered on several hills that controlled Eighth Army's main avenues of advance out of the Pusan Perimeter. 
     
    A critical terrain feature in the breakout was Hill 268 which controlled the Taegu road and the main highway running from Waegwan south along the east bank of the Naktong River. On Sept. 16, and for the next three days, 5th RCT sol-diers met stiff enemy resistance in their battle for the hill. Halfway up the finger of Hill 268 the Americans became pinned down by enemy rifle fire and grenades coming from the trenches on the south side. After subduing the entrenched enemy, the 5th RCT penetrated the North Korean's defensive position. As North Korean soldiers fled to the north end of Hill 268, the Americans continued their assault. 
     
    With the Waegwan-Taegu road opened, the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 7th Cavalry pushed northeast up the road. The regiment's 1st Battalion turned east toward Tabu-dong and captured the town the next day and then turned south toward Taegu. On Sept. 21, the 1st Battalion linked up with the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, which was attacking north from Taegu. The link-up by the Americans at Tabu-dong encircled and cut off large elements of the North Korean 1st, 3rd, and 13th Divisions. With the U.S. Army 24th Infantry Division in reserve, 1st Cavalry Division forces advanced from Tabu-dong northward by the way of Poun and Chongju. In one day, Sept. 26, elements of the division traveled more than 100 miles from north of the Naktong to the north of Osan, where it linked up with elements of the 31st Infantry of the 7th Infantry Division.
     
    In southwestern Korea, the 25th Infantry Division experienced heavy going for the first few days in its drive down the Masan-Chinju road; but it soon gained momentum, and on Sept. 26, the division was several miles west of Chinju. By the end of September, the division had seized the west coast port of Kunsan. Along the east coast the advancing South Korean Army also forced the enemy into a general retreat.
     
    As anticipated by MacArthur, the North Korean army was cut off and in retreat; United Nations Command forces captured 23,000 enemy personnel. The North Korean Army then fighting in South Korea disintegrated as an effective military force. While some North Koreans escaped to the north, others became guerrillas in the south. With the liberation of Seoul by X Corps, the return of the city to the South Korean government on Sept. 29, and the end of organized enemy resistance in the south, U.N. and American officials faced a new situation that presented an opportunity to achieve wider military and political objectives.
     
    The breakout from the Pusan Perimeter cost the U.S. Army 4,334 casualties: 790 killed and 3,544 wounded.
     

    Sources

     
    Appleman, Roy E. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu (1986).
     
    Department of Military Art and Engineering. Operations in Korea (1956).
     
    Esposito, Vincent J., ed. The West Point Atlas of American Wars, 1900—1953 2, (1959).
     
    Sandler, Stanley, ed. The Korean War, An Encyclopedia (1995).
     
    Summers, Harry G., Jr. Korean War Almanac (1990).
     
    For additional information contact:
    The U.S. Army Center of Military History
    103 Third Avenue
    Fort Lesley J. McNair
    Washington, D.C. 20319-5058
    [safe_summary] => ) ) [#formatter] => text_default [0] => Array ( [#markup] =>

     

     

    On Sept. 16, one day after the Inchon landing, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker's Eighth Army (EUSA) began to push out of the Pusan Perimeter. In mounting this offensive, General Walker had under his command the 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions, and I Corps. Attached to the corps were the U.S. 24th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions, the 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), the British 27th Infantry Brigade, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK) 1st Infantry Division and supporting troops. Later, on Sept. 23, IX Corps became operational and had the 2d and 25th Divisions attached to it. Walker's 140,000-man force stood opposite approximately 70,000 North Korean soldiers on the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September 1950. 
     
    On the eve of EUSA's offensive, the North Koreans began another attack east from Waegwan with its main effort directed along the Taegu-Kumchon-Taejon-Suwon axis. The momentum of the breakout built up slowly in the face of enemy resistance centered on several hills that controlled Eighth Army's main avenues of advance out of the Pusan Perimeter. 
     
    A critical terrain feature in the breakout was Hill 268 which controlled the Taegu road and the main highway running from Waegwan south along the east bank of the Naktong River. On Sept. 16, and for the next three days, 5th RCT sol-diers met stiff enemy resistance in their battle for the hill. Halfway up the finger of Hill 268 the Americans became pinned down by enemy rifle fire and grenades coming from the trenches on the south side. After subduing the entrenched enemy, the 5th RCT penetrated the North Korean's defensive position. As North Korean soldiers fled to the north end of Hill 268, the Americans continued their assault. 
     
    With the Waegwan-Taegu road opened, the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 7th Cavalry pushed northeast up the road. The regiment's 1st Battalion turned east toward Tabu-dong and captured the town the next day and then turned south toward Taegu. On Sept. 21, the 1st Battalion linked up with the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, which was attacking north from Taegu. The link-up by the Americans at Tabu-dong encircled and cut off large elements of the North Korean 1st, 3rd, and 13th Divisions. With the U.S. Army 24th Infantry Division in reserve, 1st Cavalry Division forces advanced from Tabu-dong northward by the way of Poun and Chongju. In one day, Sept. 26, elements of the division traveled more than 100 miles from north of the Naktong to the north of Osan, where it linked up with elements of the 31st Infantry of the 7th Infantry Division.
     
    In southwestern Korea, the 25th Infantry Division experienced heavy going for the first few days in its drive down the Masan-Chinju road; but it soon gained momentum, and on Sept. 26, the division was several miles west of Chinju. By the end of September, the division had seized the west coast port of Kunsan. Along the east coast the advancing South Korean Army also forced the enemy into a general retreat.
     
    As anticipated by MacArthur, the North Korean army was cut off and in retreat; United Nations Command forces captured 23,000 enemy personnel. The North Korean Army then fighting in South Korea disintegrated as an effective military force. While some North Koreans escaped to the north, others became guerrillas in the south. With the liberation of Seoul by X Corps, the return of the city to the South Korean government on Sept. 29, and the end of organized enemy resistance in the south, U.N. and American officials faced a new situation that presented an opportunity to achieve wider military and political objectives.
     
    The breakout from the Pusan Perimeter cost the U.S. Army 4,334 casualties: 790 killed and 3,544 wounded.
     

    Sources

     
    Appleman, Roy E. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu (1986).
     
    Department of Military Art and Engineering. Operations in Korea (1956).
     
    Esposito, Vincent J., ed. The West Point Atlas of American Wars, 1900—1953 2, (1959).
     
    Sandler, Stanley, ed. The Korean War, An Encyclopedia (1995).
     
    Summers, Harry G., Jr. Korean War Almanac (1990).
     
    For additional information contact:
    The U.S. Army Center of Military History
    103 Third Avenue
    Fort Lesley J. McNair
    Washington, D.C. 20319-5058
    ) ) [#sorted] => 1 [#children] =>

     

     

    On Sept. 16, one day after the Inchon landing, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker's Eighth Army (EUSA) began to push out of the Pusan Perimeter. In mounting this offensive, General Walker had under his command the 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions, and I Corps. Attached to the corps were the U.S. 24th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions, the 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), the British 27th Infantry Brigade, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK) 1st Infantry Division and supporting troops. Later, on Sept. 23, IX Corps became operational and had the 2d and 25th Divisions attached to it. Walker's 140,000-man force stood opposite approximately 70,000 North Korean soldiers on the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September 1950. 
     
    On the eve of EUSA's offensive, the North Koreans began another attack east from Waegwan with its main effort directed along the Taegu-Kumchon-Taejon-Suwon axis. The momentum of the breakout built up slowly in the face of enemy resistance centered on several hills that controlled Eighth Army's main avenues of advance out of the Pusan Perimeter. 
     
    A critical terrain feature in the breakout was Hill 268 which controlled the Taegu road and the main highway running from Waegwan south along the east bank of the Naktong River. On Sept. 16, and for the next three days, 5th RCT sol-diers met stiff enemy resistance in their battle for the hill. Halfway up the finger of Hill 268 the Americans became pinned down by enemy rifle fire and grenades coming from the trenches on the south side. After subduing the entrenched enemy, the 5th RCT penetrated the North Korean's defensive position. As North Korean soldiers fled to the north end of Hill 268, the Americans continued their assault. 
     
    With the Waegwan-Taegu road opened, the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 7th Cavalry pushed northeast up the road. The regiment's 1st Battalion turned east toward Tabu-dong and captured the town the next day and then turned south toward Taegu. On Sept. 21, the 1st Battalion linked up with the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, which was attacking north from Taegu. The link-up by the Americans at Tabu-dong encircled and cut off large elements of the North Korean 1st, 3rd, and 13th Divisions. With the U.S. Army 24th Infantry Division in reserve, 1st Cavalry Division forces advanced from Tabu-dong northward by the way of Poun and Chongju. In one day, Sept. 26, elements of the division traveled more than 100 miles from north of the Naktong to the north of Osan, where it linked up with elements of the 31st Infantry of the 7th Infantry Division.
     
    In southwestern Korea, the 25th Infantry Division experienced heavy going for the first few days in its drive down the Masan-Chinju road; but it soon gained momentum, and on Sept. 26, the division was several miles west of Chinju. By the end of September, the division had seized the west coast port of Kunsan. Along the east coast the advancing South Korean Army also forced the enemy into a general retreat.
     
    As anticipated by MacArthur, the North Korean army was cut off and in retreat; United Nations Command forces captured 23,000 enemy personnel. The North Korean Army then fighting in South Korea disintegrated as an effective military force. While some North Koreans escaped to the north, others became guerrillas in the south. With the liberation of Seoul by X Corps, the return of the city to the South Korean government on Sept. 29, and the end of organized enemy resistance in the south, U.N. and American officials faced a new situation that presented an opportunity to achieve wider military and political objectives.
     
    The breakout from the Pusan Perimeter cost the U.S. Army 4,334 casualties: 790 killed and 3,544 wounded.
     

    Sources

     
    Appleman, Roy E. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu (1986).
     
    Department of Military Art and Engineering. Operations in Korea (1956).
     
    Esposito, Vincent J., ed. The West Point Atlas of American Wars, 1900—1953 2, (1959).
     
    Sandler, Stanley, ed. The Korean War, An Encyclopedia (1995).
     
    Summers, Harry G., Jr. Korean War Almanac (1990).
     
    For additional information contact:
    The U.S. Army Center of Military History
    103 Third Avenue
    Fort Lesley J. McNair
    Washington, D.C. 20319-5058
    [#printed] => 1 ) [#sorted] => 1 [#children] =>

     

     

    On Sept. 16, one day after the Inchon landing, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker's Eighth Army (EUSA) began to push out of the Pusan Perimeter. In mounting this offensive, General Walker had under his command the 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions, and I Corps. Attached to the corps were the U.S. 24th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions, the 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), the British 27th Infantry Brigade, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK) 1st Infantry Division and supporting troops. Later, on Sept. 23, IX Corps became operational and had the 2d and 25th Divisions attached to it. Walker's 140,000-man force stood opposite approximately 70,000 North Korean soldiers on the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September 1950. 
     
    On the eve of EUSA's offensive, the North Koreans began another attack east from Waegwan with its main effort directed along the Taegu-Kumchon-Taejon-Suwon axis. The momentum of the breakout built up slowly in the face of enemy resistance centered on several hills that controlled Eighth Army's main avenues of advance out of the Pusan Perimeter. 
     
    A critical terrain feature in the breakout was Hill 268 which controlled the Taegu road and the main highway running from Waegwan south along the east bank of the Naktong River. On Sept. 16, and for the next three days, 5th RCT sol-diers met stiff enemy resistance in their battle for the hill. Halfway up the finger of Hill 268 the Americans became pinned down by enemy rifle fire and grenades coming from the trenches on the south side. After subduing the entrenched enemy, the 5th RCT penetrated the North Korean's defensive position. As North Korean soldiers fled to the north end of Hill 268, the Americans continued their assault. 
     
    With the Waegwan-Taegu road opened, the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 7th Cavalry pushed northeast up the road. The regiment's 1st Battalion turned east toward Tabu-dong and captured the town the next day and then turned south toward Taegu. On Sept. 21, the 1st Battalion linked up with the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, which was attacking north from Taegu. The link-up by the Americans at Tabu-dong encircled and cut off large elements of the North Korean 1st, 3rd, and 13th Divisions. With the U.S. Army 24th Infantry Division in reserve, 1st Cavalry Division forces advanced from Tabu-dong northward by the way of Poun and Chongju. In one day, Sept. 26, elements of the division traveled more than 100 miles from north of the Naktong to the north of Osan, where it linked up with elements of the 31st Infantry of the 7th Infantry Division.
     
    In southwestern Korea, the 25th Infantry Division experienced heavy going for the first few days in its drive down the Masan-Chinju road; but it soon gained momentum, and on Sept. 26, the division was several miles west of Chinju. By the end of September, the division had seized the west coast port of Kunsan. Along the east coast the advancing South Korean Army also forced the enemy into a general retreat.
     
    As anticipated by MacArthur, the North Korean army was cut off and in retreat; United Nations Command forces captured 23,000 enemy personnel. The North Korean Army then fighting in South Korea disintegrated as an effective military force. While some North Koreans escaped to the north, others became guerrillas in the south. With the liberation of Seoul by X Corps, the return of the city to the South Korean government on Sept. 29, and the end of organized enemy resistance in the south, U.N. and American officials faced a new situation that presented an opportunity to achieve wider military and political objectives.
     
    The breakout from the Pusan Perimeter cost the U.S. Army 4,334 casualties: 790 killed and 3,544 wounded.
     

    Sources

     
    Appleman, Roy E. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu (1986).
     
    Department of Military Art and Engineering. Operations in Korea (1956).
     
    Esposito, Vincent J., ed. The West Point Atlas of American Wars, 1900—1953 2, (1959).
     
    Sandler, Stanley, ed. The Korean War, An Encyclopedia (1995).
     
    Summers, Harry G., Jr. Korean War Almanac (1990).
     
    For additional information contact:
    The U.S. Army Center of Military History
    103 Third Avenue
    Fort Lesley J. McNair
    Washington, D.C. 20319-5058
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    On Sept. 16, one day after the Inchon landing, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker's Eighth Army (EUSA) began to push out of the Pusan Perimeter. In mounting this offensive, General Walker had under his command the 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions, and I Corps. Attached to the corps were the U.S. 24th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions, the 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), the British 27th Infantry Brigade, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK) 1st Infantry Division and supporting troops. Later, on Sept. 23, IX Corps became operational and had the 2d and 25th Divisions attached to it. Walker's 140,000-man force stood opposite approximately 70,000 North Korean soldiers on the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September 1950. 
     
    On the eve of EUSA's offensive, the North Koreans began another attack east from Waegwan with its main effort directed along the Taegu-Kumchon-Taejon-Suwon axis. The momentum of the breakout built up slowly in the face of enemy resistance centered on several hills that controlled Eighth Army's main avenues of advance out of the Pusan Perimeter. 
     
    A critical terrain feature in the breakout was Hill 268 which controlled the Taegu road and the main highway running from Waegwan south along the east bank of the Naktong River. On Sept. 16, and for the next three days, 5th RCT sol-diers met stiff enemy resistance in their battle for the hill. Halfway up the finger of Hill 268 the Americans became pinned down by enemy rifle fire and grenades coming from the trenches on the south side. After subduing the entrenched enemy, the 5th RCT penetrated the North Korean's defensive position. As North Korean soldiers fled to the north end of Hill 268, the Americans continued their assault. 
     
    With the Waegwan-Taegu road opened, the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 7th Cavalry pushed northeast up the road. The regiment's 1st Battalion turned east toward Tabu-dong and captured the town the next day and then turned south toward Taegu. On Sept. 21, the 1st Battalion linked up with the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, which was attacking north from Taegu. The link-up by the Americans at Tabu-dong encircled and cut off large elements of the North Korean 1st, 3rd, and 13th Divisions. With the U.S. Army 24th Infantry Division in reserve, 1st Cavalry Division forces advanced from Tabu-dong northward by the way of Poun and Chongju. In one day, Sept. 26, elements of the division traveled more than 100 miles from north of the Naktong to the north of Osan, where it linked up with elements of the 31st Infantry of the 7th Infantry Division.
     
    In southwestern Korea, the 25th Infantry Division experienced heavy going for the first few days in its drive down the Masan-Chinju road; but it soon gained momentum, and on Sept. 26, the division was several miles west of Chinju. By the end of September, the division had seized the west coast port of Kunsan. Along the east coast the advancing South Korean Army also forced the enemy into a general retreat.
     
    As anticipated by MacArthur, the North Korean army was cut off and in retreat; United Nations Command forces captured 23,000 enemy personnel. The North Korean Army then fighting in South Korea disintegrated as an effective military force. While some North Koreans escaped to the north, others became guerrillas in the south. With the liberation of Seoul by X Corps, the return of the city to the South Korean government on Sept. 29, and the end of organized enemy resistance in the south, U.N. and American officials faced a new situation that presented an opportunity to achieve wider military and political objectives.
     
    The breakout from the Pusan Perimeter cost the U.S. Army 4,334 casualties: 790 killed and 3,544 wounded.
     

    Sources

     
    Appleman, Roy E. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu (1986).
     
    Department of Military Art and Engineering. Operations in Korea (1956).
     
    Esposito, Vincent J., ed. The West Point Atlas of American Wars, 1900—1953 2, (1959).
     
    Sandler, Stanley, ed. The Korean War, An Encyclopedia (1995).
     
    Summers, Harry G., Jr. Korean War Almanac (1990).
     
    For additional information contact:
    The U.S. Army Center of Military History
    103 Third Avenue
    Fort Lesley J. McNair
    Washington, D.C. 20319-5058
    [#printed] => 1 ) [#sorted] => 1 [#theme_wrappers] => Array ( [0] => region ) [#region] => content [#printed] => 1 [#children] =>

     

     

    On Sept. 16, one day after the Inchon landing, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker's Eighth Army (EUSA) began to push out of the Pusan Perimeter. In mounting this offensive, General Walker had under his command the 2d and 25th Infantry Divisions, and I Corps. Attached to the corps were the U.S. 24th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions, the 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), the British 27th Infantry Brigade, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK) 1st Infantry Division and supporting troops. Later, on Sept. 23, IX Corps became operational and had the 2d and 25th Divisions attached to it. Walker's 140,000-man force stood opposite approximately 70,000 North Korean soldiers on the Pusan Perimeter in mid-September 1950. 
     
    On the eve of EUSA's offensive, the North Koreans began another attack east from Waegwan with its main effort directed along the Taegu-Kumchon-Taejon-Suwon axis. The momentum of the breakout built up slowly in the face of enemy resistance centered on several hills that controlled Eighth Army's main avenues of advance out of the Pusan Perimeter. 
     
    A critical terrain feature in the breakout was Hill 268 which controlled the Taegu road and the main highway running from Waegwan south along the east bank of the Naktong River. On Sept. 16, and for the next three days, 5th RCT sol-diers met stiff enemy resistance in their battle for the hill. Halfway up the finger of Hill 268 the Americans became pinned down by enemy rifle fire and grenades coming from the trenches on the south side. After subduing the entrenched enemy, the 5th RCT penetrated the North Korean's defensive position. As North Korean soldiers fled to the north end of Hill 268, the Americans continued their assault. 
     
    With the Waegwan-Taegu road opened, the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 7th Cavalry pushed northeast up the road. The regiment's 1st Battalion turned east toward Tabu-dong and captured the town the next day and then turned south toward Taegu. On Sept. 21, the 1st Battalion linked up with the 8th Cavalry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division, which was attacking north from Taegu. The link-up by the Americans at Tabu-dong encircled and cut off large elements of the North Korean 1st, 3rd, and 13th Divisions. With the U.S. Army 24th Infantry Division in reserve, 1st Cavalry Division forces advanced from Tabu-dong northward by the way of Poun and Chongju. In one day, Sept. 26, elements of the division traveled more than 100 miles from north of the Naktong to the north of Osan, where it linked up with elements of the 31st Infantry of the 7th Infantry Division.
     
    In southwestern Korea, the 25th Infantry Division experienced heavy going for the first few days in its drive down the Masan-Chinju road; but it soon gained momentum, and on Sept. 26, the division was several miles west of Chinju. By the end of September, the division had seized the west coast port of Kunsan. Along the east coast the advancing South Korean Army also forced the enemy into a general retreat.
     
    As anticipated by MacArthur, the North Korean army was cut off and in retreat; United Nations Command forces captured 23,000 enemy personnel. The North Korean Army then fighting in South Korea disintegrated as an effective military force. While some North Koreans escaped to the north, others became guerrillas in the south. With the liberation of Seoul by X Corps, the return of the city to the South Korean government on Sept. 29, and the end of organized enemy resistance in the south, U.N. and American officials faced a new situation that presented an opportunity to achieve wider military and political objectives.
     
    The breakout from the Pusan Perimeter cost the U.S. Army 4,334 casualties: 790 killed and 3,544 wounded.
     

    Sources

     
    Appleman, Roy E. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu (1986).
     
    Department of Military Art and Engineering. Operations in Korea (1956).
     
    Esposito, Vincent J., ed. The West Point Atlas of American Wars, 1900—1953 2, (1959).
     
    Sandler, Stanley, ed. The Korean War, An Encyclopedia (1995).
     
    Summers, Harry G., Jr. Korean War Almanac (1990).
     
    For additional information contact:
    The U.S. Army Center of Military History
    103 Third Avenue
    Fort Lesley J. McNair
    Washington, D.C. 20319-5058
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